Spanish Indie Band Minimal Releases Its Fourth Album

Courtesy of Minimal.

Courtesy of Minimal.

By Itzel Quintana

Miami-based Indie Alternative band Minimal is not what its name suggests.

With lyrics encouraging listeners to find their independence and voice, the band hopes to correct the mistakes of previous generations.

“In our culture, kids are taught that speaking your mind is a sign of disrespect,” said Gabriel Ayala, lead singer and guitarist of the band.

Ayala met drummer Alejandro Angee and guitarist Roberto Taninaka in high school 13 years ago. They all shared two things in common: they were from different Latin American countries and wanted to play loud, high energy music.

The first project proved to be too disorganized for the band’s liking so it chose to go in a different direction while staying true to its roots, resulting in the creation of Minimal.

Minimal wanted to make a statement by being experimental.

The band has a strong rock en español background, taking influence from acts like Café Tacuba. According to Ayala, the band also adores 90s alternative and grunge bands like Radiohead and Pearl Jam.

“The fact that we grew up here is just as important as where we come from,” Ayala said.

By mixing the sounds of members’ multicultural influences, Minimal has created an uncommon and distinct name for itself in Miami.

Since the band’s creation it has released four studio albums that all revolve around intricate electronic beats. Bassist, Fernando Llanas joined Minimal two years ago and contributed to the band’s latest release in July, Fauna.

Fauna’s creation was carefully planned. The band wanted to achieve a wild, distorted guitar driven sound with its new album.

Minimal stripped itself of the electronic element and committed to achieve a raw sound by focusing on its instruments.

“Although it’s darker and more wild than the other albums, [Fauna] is also very rich,” Ayala said. “We’ve improved a lot.”

The album was recorded in an abandoned Baptist church turned art hub located in the Wynwood area of Miami.

Producer Rafael Lazarro, who has worked with bands such as Tame Impala and Rita Indiana, set up a mobile studio in a chamber of the church where religious services were held. Six days later Fauna was complete.

According to Ayala, the band likes to work with conceptual themes, which is clear in its new album. Fauna was crafted around the band’s view of big, urban areas of the world.

They interpret big cities as massive cement jungles with a wonderful collection of different people. They attempted to bring their interpretation to life through the geometric animal masks they wear in pictures and videos.

Minimal has spent time touring in support of Fauna since its release. The group is playing at a Unidos Por la Musica fundraiser concert in LA Nov. 6 in support of the Dreamers and Dream Act.

The event will take place at Los Globos and the money made will go towards scholarships that will benefit Dreamers.

The concert starts at 7 p.m., tickets are $25 before the event and $30 at the door.

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